+91 265 230 3131

 4th Floor, Aries Complex, Opp. Neptune Tower, BPC Road, Alkapuri, Vadodara-390007.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is it necessary to hire a lawyer or a consultant to immigrate to Canada?

It is possible to apply for permanent residence in Canada by oneself. It is also possible to hire the assistance of an intermediary, which can be a professionally licensed and trained Canadian lawyer, specializing in immigration law or any consultant or paralegal. But we often saw cases, when the applicants who had all the chances to pass as independent immigrants failed to do so, for example, due to the mistakes in filling in application forms or because of incorrect behavior at the interview. That's why a lawyer is needed, to proficiently introduce the client to all immigration authorities and to properly prepare him for an interview, thus ensuring the successful immigration to Canada.

What guarantees do you give to your clients and how many percent?

Nobody ever provide guarantees, since only an officer of the immigration service can make the final decision on a specific immigration matter. We can only guarantee that the application will be completed in a professional manner. Nonetheless, for example, in my firm we take on the job only after the client has filled in a preliminary questionnaire and, in case of necessity, a careful preliminary assessment of the client's documents. Only after that we can tell the client how good his chances for success are or explain to the client that unfortunately, cannot help him.

How much are your fees?

We not only complete the application forms, but also represent the client on all the stages of the immigration process. Therefore, the price of our services depends on how much work the case involves the category through which the client is processed and, consequently, the price is determined in each specific case.

What is included in that cost?

This cost includes complete immigration service of the client up to the moment of his arrival to Canada, starting from the preparation of the necessary package of the documents to the embassy; translation and certification of the documents; all postal expenses, phone calls and faxes; and also personally prepare the clients who already received an invitation for the interview. It includes all pre services and post services of immigration which is mentioned in OUR SERVICES.

How to start the immigration process?

First you must decide to immigrate. Then you must complete the preliminary questionnaire that you can find on our site, answering all of the questions, and not forgetting to put down your address, which, unfortunately, happens rather often. Within 1 - 2 days we will do a preliminary assessment of your chances to immigrate to Canada and will give you an answer.

What documents are necessary to begin the work on immigration process?

Among the documents that are necessary to start work on immigration file there must be copies of birth certificates, educational certificates and diplomas, marriage and divorce certificates, passports, police certificates, employment reference letter and some other certificates. The applicant receives a more complete list of necessary documents after the preliminary assessment of his immigration application. Certification of the copies and their translations is not necessary because this is included in the fees.

How long does it usually take to process a file?

The processing of the file usually takes from a year to two years.

What is Permanent Resident Visa?

It's a document that allows its beneficiary to live and work anywhere in Canada, this document also confirms the status of the permanent resident of Canada. Permanent Resident Visa allows its beneficiary to have the same rights (except for voting) and responsibilities as Canadian citizens. Permanent Resident can lose the status of the permanent resident if he is absent from Canada for a longer period of time than allowed by the law or commits a crime.

Which member of the family should apply as the principal applicant?

The principal applicant should be that member of the family whose application can get the most points. This decision plays the decisive role, because whether the principal applicant is approved or refused, the result automatically affects the entire family. The family means a husband, a wife, and their under-aged or dependent children.

Which family members can be included in the application for permanent residence?

They are the spouse and children under 22. The family members whom you included in your application must pass medical examination and have no criminal record. Other family members, for example, such as parents, cannot be included in your application, but you can sponsor them after you come to Canada and have worked in the country for no less than a year.

Can I extend my immigrant visa?

No, this visa cannot be extended. If you couldn't arrive in Canada before the time shown on your Permanent Resident Visa, then you will have to start the whole immigration process from the very beginning.

Can I get a visitor visa, if I'd already applied for a Permanent Resident Visa?

The decision of issuing you a visitor visa for temporary stay in Canada will be affected not by the application for permanent residence, but by the definite answer to the question, what is the possibility that you will stay in Canada after the expiry of your visitor visa.

After the family receives Permanent Resident Visas can only one family member come to Canada at first and the other afterwards?

In each Permanent Resident Visa there is a date of its validity, you must enter Canada before the expiry of this date. As a rule it is a year after the medical examination. The immigration law allows that first the principal applicant can enter Canada and the rest of the family can come later but certainly before the expiry date on the Permanent Resident Visa.

What minimal sum of money must I have before arriving to Canada?

The independent immigrant should have $10 000 Canadian for the principal applicant plus $2000 for each additional family member who will live in Canada. These expenses are necessary for living and adjustment of the family in Canada during the first 6 months of the family in the country.

When will I be able to become a Canadian citizen?

You will be able to become a Canadian citizen after you have lived in the country for 3 years.

Is it possible to qualify as a skilled Worker with less than 67 points?

Yes, the Canadian Government has empowered Visa Officers to use positive discretion to pass an applicant when the Visa Officer believes that the total points awarded do not properly reflect the applicant's ability to establish in Canada from an economic perspective. Conversely, a Visa Officer has the discretion to refuse an applicant with more than 67 points.

Does a Skilled Worker have any financial requirements?

Skilled Worker applicants, as a general rule, must demonstrate that they have sufficient funds to support themselves, and any accompanying dependants, for six months after their arrival in Canada.

Are there any residency requirements?

A permanent resident must comply with a residency obligation with respect to every five-year period. The permanent resident complies with the residency obligation provisions if, for at least 730 days (2 years) in that 5 year period the permanent resident present in Canada or is:

  • Outside of Canada accompanying a Canadian citizen who is his or her spouse or common-law partner or a child accompanying a parent
  • Outside Canada employed on a full-time basis by a Canadian business
  • Is an accompanying spouse, common-law partner or child of a permanent resident who is outside Canada and is employed as a full-time basis by a Canadian business.

Can my relative in Canada apply on my behalf?

The application to the embassy or a visa post located outside of Canada must be submitted under your name. Nevertheless, a close relative who lives in Canada can give extra points to your application.

Who must the principal applicant – my spouse or my-self?

Each of you can be the principal applicant – it depends on which of you gets more points.

 

Federal skilled workers

What does "federal skilled worker" mean?

Skilled workers are selected as permanent residents based on their education, work experience, knowledge of English and/or French, and other criteria that have been shown to help them become economically established in Canada.

The term "federal skilled worker" refers to the category under which skilled workers apply if they want to live in any Canadian province or territory except Quebec.

Skilled workers who want to live in Quebec apply under a separate category. The province of Quebec selects its own skilled workers and therefore applicants going to Quebec through that program are known as "Quebec-selected" skilled workers.

What if I have already applied and want to withdraw my application? Can I get my money back?

You can contact your local visa office and withdraw your application. Your fee will be refunded as long as the office has not begun processing your application.

Will my fee be refunded if my application is returned or refused?

If you applied before February 27, 2008, the date the changes to the immigration law took effect, your application will be processed. You will not get a refund unless you choose to withdraw your application before it is processed. If you applied on or after February 27, 2008, and your application is not eligible for processing, you will get a full refund. If your application is processed and it is refused, you will not get a refund.

What is "arranged employment"?

Arranged employment is where a skilled worker applicant has a certain kind of job offer in place before applying to immigrate to Canada.

Is the simplified application process still being used for skilled workers?

No. Changes have been made to the way skilled worker applications are processed. As a result, applicants are now asked to submit a completed regular application (IMM 0008).

 

Changes to language testing

What changes are you making to the language requirements?

Under the changes to the Federal Skilled Worker Program and the Canadian Experience Class, all new applicants are required to include the results of an English or French language test as part of their application. Previously, applicants also had the option of proving their language ability via a written submission. The written submission was intended for people whose first language was English or French. However, non-native English and French speakers frequently used this option, making it difficult for visa officers to perform an accurate assessment of the applicant's true language ability. As a result CIC now only accepts designated third-party language tests as proof of language ability.

Are any applicants exempt from the mandatory language test? What about applicants from English or French speaking countries? Why would someone from England need to take an English test, for example?

There are no exceptions to this rule. We want to ensure that all applicants are evaluated against the same standards, no matter what their language of origin, nationality or ethnicity.

When did this change come into effect?

The change applies to all federal skilled worker and Canadian Experience Class applications received on or after June 26th, 2010.

What improvements in processing times do you anticipate with this change?

Visa officers will now only spend minutes evaluating language proficiency as they will simply assign points based on the language test results. This compares to the months it takes to process an application when written evidence is provided and found insufficient.

What are the advantages for applicants of submitting the results of a third-party language assessment to demonstrate ability in English and/or French?

The biggest advantage for the applicant is that they will know ahead of time how their language proficiency will be evaluated. Federal skilled worker applicants will know exactly how many points they will be awarded. In addition, applicants get an objective, realistic assessment of their language ability and areas for possible improvement. Submitting a language test is also the most efficient way to evaluate language proficiency; it speeds up application processing. Finally, many regulatory bodies and industry sectors require language testing or other proof of language assessment, so in taking the test applicants are one step further on the path to integration into the Canadian labour market.

Where can applicants get tested for language proficiency?

Language tests for FSW and CEC applicants are available internationally through the International English Language Testing Service and the Test d'évaluation du français. FSW applicants can also obtain a language test in Canada through the Canadian English Language Proficiency Index Program. More information and details on the language test requirements.

 

Spouses, partners and dependent children

Why should I apply under the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada Class instead of applying to stay in Canada on humanitarian and compassionate grounds?

People apply to remain in Canada on humanitarian and compassionate grounds because they do not meet the criteria to apply in any other class. Spouses and common-law partners should apply in the Family Class. The Family Class will exempt you from some of the financial and medical requirements, and you can include other family members (who are in Canada or in another country) on your application for permanent residence. The process in the Family Class is much faster than an application on humanitarian and compassionate grounds.

If I have overstayed my visa or visitor record or if I have been working or studying without a permit, can I apply for permanent residence under the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada Class? If yes, how do I apply?

Yes. You can apply for permanent residence under a public policy that creates exceptions to the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada Class, if you are still in Canada. You can download the application kit, or order it by contacting the Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) Call Centre, toll free at 1 888 242-2100 (from within Canada only). CIC will mail the application kit to you—delivery takes about two weeks.

The application kit contains everything you will need, including the sponsorship application that your spouse or partner must fill out.

I entered Canada without a valid passport or travel document. Can I apply for permanent residence under the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada Class?

Yes. You can apply under the public policy relating to the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada Class. However, you must obtain a valid passport from your home country or travel documents before Citizenship and Immigration Canada will grant you permanent residence.

Can I apply for permanent residence under the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada Class if I am inadmissible to Canada?

Yes. You can apply under the public policy relating to the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada Class. However, your application for permanent residence may not be approved if there are reasons that prevent you from staying in Canada that are not related to lack of status. For example, you may not be allowed to stay in Canada if you do not meet medical or security requirements, or if you have been convicted of a criminal offence.

I am a temporary resident permit holder. Can I apply to become a permanent resident as a sponsored spouse or common-law partner?

If you are in Canada on a temporary resident permit, you can apply to become a permanent resident of Canada. However, if you have a temporary resident permit because you are in admissible to Canada for reasons other than lack of status, you cannot be granted permanent residence under the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada Class.

I was deported from Canada and I returned without getting proper permission. Can I apply as a permanent resident under the public policy for the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada Class?

Your application will be refused because you do not have permission to be in Canada. You may be able to be sponsored from abroad if you return to your home country.

In Canada. In addition, you could be subject to removal.

Can I cancel my application once it has been approved?

If you change your mind about sponsoring a family member, you must write a letter to the appropriate Case Processing Centre before a permanent resident visa is issued. Once permanent resident visas are issued, the promise that you and, if applicable, your co-signer, made to support your family member is valid for the term of your application. The application is an unconditional promise of support. For example, the granting of Canadian citizenship, relationship breakdown or moving to another province does not cancel the application. The application also remains in effect if your financial situation changes and you can no longer afford to provide financial support.

What family members may come with me to Canada when I immigrate?

The family members that can come with you to Canada when you become a permanent resident include:

  • Your spouse or common-law partner
  • Your dependent child or your spouse or common-law partner's dependent child and
  • A dependent child of a dependent child.

Your parents, grandparents and other family members are not eligible to come to Canada with you. However, you can apply to sponsor them to come to Canada after you immigrate here.

I want to sponsor my spouse. Is it faster to apply from inside or outside Canada?

It is usually faster to apply to sponsor a spouse from outside Canada. However, the requirements to immigrate to Canada are the same in both cases. Some differences between the processes:

 

Inside Canada

  • Average of 12 to 18 months to process routine applications
  • No right of appeal
  • You are advised to stay in Canada while your application is being processed (If you leave Canada and cannot re-enter, the application will be abandoned)
  • You can send an application for an open work permit with the sponsorship application (the permit will be issued as soon as you are eligible for it)

Outside Canada

  • Average of 6 to 12 months to process routine applications
  • Right of appeal
  • You can leave and re-enter Canada while your application is being processed as long as you meet all requirements to enter Canada
  • If you want to work in Canada while your application is being processed, you must apply for a regular work permit

How can I check the status of my application?

You may check your application status on this website, using the e-client Application Status service (e-CAS) of the Citizenship and Immigration website.

If you are sponsoring a member of the family class, you may also check case status through the CIC Call Centre. In Canada, call 1-888-242-2100. In some cases, you can use our Case Specific Enquiry Form. Choose International Visa Office. Choose the Canadian visa office you applied to from the list and look under "Case specific enquiries." Please read the instructions carefully before sending an enquiry using that form.

Are there special immigration procedures for different provinces in Canada?

Certain provinces have been given the authority by Citizenship and Immigration Canada to select or nominate candidates for immigration destined to their respective province under the Provincial Nomination Program.

Quebec has exclusive authority to select candidates who intend to reside in that province. These applicants are subject to Quebec's selection criteria, in addition to Federal medical and security clearance requirements. They must also pay an additional fee for processing by Quebec immigration authorities. Applicants who qualify under the Federal selection requirements may not necessarily satisfy Quebec's selection requirements, and vice versa.

 

Spouses, partners and dependent children

Does the Canadian government charge a fee for submitting a Canadian Immigration Application?

Fees are payable to the Canadian government as follows:

 

Category of applicant Currency
Federal CAD
Skilled Worker/Family Class Principal applicant $ 550
Entrepreneur, Self-Employed and Investor Principal applicant $ 1,050
Each accompanying family member 22 and over $ 550
Each family member under 22 years old $ 150
Right of Permanent Resident Fee (payable before landing) $ 490
  • Fees are subject to change at any time.
  • Additional government fees may apply for certain provincial immigration categories.

When do I pay Canadian government fees?

Canadian government fees must be submitted concurrently with your Canadian Immigration Application and are refundable at any time before assessment of the application by a Canadian Immigration Visa Officer has begun. If any provincial fees are required they are payable at the time that your application is submitted to the province. The Right of Permanent Resident Fee may be paid at any time prior to the issuance of your Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa and is refundable if, for any reason, you do not become a Canadian Permanent Resident.

In what currency must I pay the Canadian government fees?

Canadian Immigration Visa Offices will accept the payment of fees in Canadian dollars and some Canadian Immigration Visa Offices outside of Canada will also accept local currency. It is recommended to pay fees in Canadian dollars, if it is feasible, because of currency fluctuations. Canadian Immigration Visa Offices set and change exchange rates from time to time and if you have not submitted the exact foreign currency your application will be returned, causing a delay. At the very least you should consult with an expert in these matters, or seek instructions from the particular Canadian Immigration Visa Office as to the specific amount payable, the name of the payee and the bank upon which the payment may be drawn.

What is the Right of Permanent Resident Fee (RPRF)?

The principal applicant and accompanying spouse/common law partner must pay this fee currently set at CAD 490 and can do so at any time before their Canada Immigration Visa is issued. The Right of Permanent Resident Fee is fully refundable if for any reason the principal applicant or accompanying spouse/common law partner do not land in Canada as permanent residents.

If I am already in Canada, do I still have to pay the Right of Permanent Resident Fee?

Yes, all applicants 22 years of age or older must pay the Right of Permanent Resident Fee.

Are there any other fees or costs associated with the Canadian Immigration application process?

You can expect to pay fees related to medical examinations and, if required, to the notarization and/or the translation of documents into French or English.

Where can my application for a Canada Immigration Visa be submitted?

That depends upon the Canadian immigration category under which you are applying.

Under the Federal Skilled Worker category of Canadian immigration, applications must be submitted to the Centralized Intake Office (CIO) in Sydney Nova Scotia.

Under the Family Sponsorship category of Canadian immigration, applications should initially be submitted to the Case Processing Centre (CPC) in Vegreville, Alberta in the case of an inland Canada sponsorship, or to CPC Mississauga, Ontario in the case of a sponsorship to be processed outside of Canada.

Under the Business category of Canadian immigration, applications should be submitted to the Canadian Immigration Visa Office that serves the country where you are residing, if you have been lawfully admitted to that country for a period of at least one year, or the country of your nationality.

Under the Provincial Nomination Program category of Canadian immigration or if you intend to reside in the Province of Quebec, you must initially submit an application to the province in which you intend to reside.

For the Canadian Experience Class category of Canadian immigration, there are two scenarios:

  • If you are residing in Canada at the time of your application, you can submit your application to the Canadian Immigration Visa Office in Buffalo, New York.
  • If you are no longer residing in Canada, applications should be submitted to the Canadian Immigration Visa Office that serves the country where you are residing, if you have been lawfully admitted to that country for a period of at least one year, or the country of your nationality.

What documents should be submitted in support of my application for Permanent Residence in Canada?

That depends upon the category of Canadian Immigration under which you are applying.

Under the Skilled Worker category of Canadian immigration, your initial submission to the Central Intake Office (CIO) in Sydney, Nova Scotia should include application forms, copy of your passport bio-data page and appropriate Canadian government processing fees in Canadian dollars payable to the Receiver General for Canada. If you are in Canada on a Work Permit and claiming points for Arranged Employment, you must also include a copy of your Work Permit and a letter from your employer indicating that you will be employed indeterminately upon receiving your Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa or alternatively you should include a photocopy of the Arranged Employment Opinion (AEO) issued by Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) in relation to a permanent job offer that you have received from a genuine Canadian employer. In addition, all applications must include supporting documents in relation to your civil status, education, work experience and language proficiency (IELTS and/or TEF results) as well as proof of sufficiant settlement funds. Proof that you have applied for police clearance certificate(s) should also be included with the initial application.

Under the Family Sponsorship category of Canadian immigration, supporting documents usually include evidence of civil status, the genuine nature of the relationship between the parties and the ability to commit to an undertaking of support.

Under the Business category of Canadian immigration, supporting documents usually include evidence of civil status, business management/ownership experience and documents that indicate a sufficient amount of assets, legally obtained.

Under the Provincial Nomination Program of Canadian immigration or if you are intending to reside in the Province of Quebec, you will have to submit forms and documents as per the province's specific requirements.

Under the Canadian Experience Class category of Canadian immigration, supporting documents will include proof of your language proficiency (IELTS and/or TEF results), proof of your having worked in Canada and, if applicable, proof of your post-secondary studies in Canada.

Under all categories of Canadian Immigration, Citizenship and Immigration Canada requires Police Clearance Certificates from all countries that you have resided in for more than six months since your 18th birthday.

Canadian Immigration Visa Offices may, in addition, have specific requirements regarding supporting documentation. It is advisable to seek expert guidance or instructions from the Canadian Immigration Visa Office to which your application will be submitted.

When must I submit the supporting documentation?

This depends upon the category of Canadian immigration under which you are applying and the Canadian Immigration Visa Office to which you are submitting your application.

Under the Skilled Worker/Professional category of Canadian immigration, all documents need to be submitted along with your initial application to the Central Intake Office (CIO) in order to be considered.

Under the Family Sponsorship category of Canadian immigration, all supporting documents including Police Clearance Certificates and proof that a medical examination has been undergone by the sponsored person(s) must be submitted with the initial application.

Under the Entrepreneur and Self-Employed Persons business categories of Canadian immigration, as a general rule you submit only a basic application form and Canadian government processing fees to the Canadian Visa Office responsible for your country of citizenship or for the country in which you are currently residing if you were lawfully admitted to that country for at least one year. Approximatley four months prior to the assessment of your application you will be requested to submit supporting documents in relation to your civil status and business management experience. The Canadian Visa Office in Buffalo, New York is an exception to this general rule and requires all supporting documents at the time that the application is initially submitted.

Under the Investor business category of Canadian immigration, all supporting documents must be submitted to the appropriate Canadian Immigration Visa Office at the time that the application is initially submitted.

Under the Provincial Nomination Program of Canadian immigration or if you are intending to reside in the Province of Quebec, all supporting documents in relation to the provincial nomination must be submitted with the initial application to the province.

Under the Canadian Experience Class category of Canadian immigration, all supporting documents must be submitted to the appropriate Canadian Immigration Visa Office at the time that the application is initially submitted.

In what language must my supporting documentation be submitted?

Unless otherwise indicated by a particular Canadian Immigration Visa Office, all supporting documentation in a language other than English or French must be accompanied by an English or French translation, as translated by a certified translator.

Can my file be transferred from one Canadian Immigration Visa Office to another?

Under the Skilled Worker category, applications must first be submitted to the Centralized Intake Office (CIO) at CPC-Sydney in Nova Scotia. The application will then be transferred to the Canadian Immigration Visa Office outside Canada that is responsible for the country where you are residing (if you have been lawfully admitted to that country for a period of at least one year) or the country of your nationality. Applicants are responsible for indicating the correct visa office on their forms and marking the incorrect visa office may result in the return of the application.

Under any category of Canadian immigration, a request to transfer your application to another Canadian Immigration Visa Office may be made to the Canadian Immigration Visa Office processing your application. The latter will decide, based upon "program integrity", whether or not to transfer your application. In certain circumstances, the Canadian Immigration Visa Office processing your file may decide on its own to transfer your file to a different, more appropriate Canadian Immigration Visa Office, even without a request.

How long does the Canadian Immigration application process take?

Many factors affect Immigration application processing times, including the following:

  • The particular Canadian Immigration Visa Office processing your application;
  • The category of Canadian Immigration under which you apply;
  • Whether you can find work in Canada;
  • The way in which your application and supporting documents have been prepared;
  • Whether or not you are required to attend a personal interview; and,
  • Events beyond your control.

It is difficult to find a reliable source to provide you with an accurate indication of just how long it will take for you to receive your Canada Immigration Visa. Citizenship and Immigration Canada publishes all Canadian Immigration Visa Offices' application processing times for Skilled Workers, Business Applicants, Provincial Nominees and Family Sponsorships. However, those published times are not always current and are also vague. Information you may find on newsgroups and forums is even less trustworthy as there is no accountability for the messages posted on them. Be suspect of anyone who tells you that there is a way to get your Canada Immigration Visa quicker for a fee; it is not true.

The Minister of Citizenship and Immigration has announced that the government's goal is to complete the processing of all applications submitted after February 27, 2008 under the Skilled Worker category of Canadian immigration within 6 to 12 months.

What is meant by the "locked-in" date?

A locked-in date is the date on which the Canadian Immigration Visa Office receives completed application forms and proper payment of the processing fees. The Federal Court of Canada has determined the locked-in date to be the date on which certain selection factors must be assessed.

Who can I include on my Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa?

You can include your spouse and your dependent children on your application. For the purposes of you application, a dependent child is defined as a child less than 22 years of age who is not married or in a common-law relationship, or a child over the age of 22 who is currently enrolled in an education institution and is financially dependent on you. It is important to keep in mind that Canada recognizes same-sex partnerships.

What if my relationship status changes or I have children while my application is in process or after my Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa has been issued?

You must keep the Canadian Immigration Visa Office informed of any changes in your family composition while your application is in process. You must add your spouse or child to your application for a Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa so that they can accompany you to Canada. If your family composition changes after your Visa is issued, you must advise Citizenship and Immigration Canada to add a spouse or child to your application, provided you have not yet landed in Canada.

 

FAQ'S FOR MANITOBA PROVINCIAL NOMINEE PROGRAM

What is the Manitoba Provincial Nominee program (MB PNP)?

The Manitoba Provincial Nominee program is an immigration program. It allows the government of Manitoba to recruit and assess immigrants who are best suited to contribute to the province's economy and who intend to live and work in Manitoba. The MB PNP seeks out potential immigrants who are good candidates for Manitoba but who otherwise may not qualify under Canada's immigration criteria. An applicant nominated by Manitoba should receive favourable and prompt consideration from Citizenship and Immigration Canada as long as they comply with medical and statutory requirements. There are two categories of immigrants under the Provincial Nominee program. One is skilled workers and the other is business immigrants. This application kit has information and forms for skilled workers; that is, individuals with a combination of education, training and experience that allow them to contribute to and benefit from Manitoba's economic growth. Information on the Manitoba Provincial Nominee program for business is available on the Internet at www.immigratemanitoba.com or by contacting Manitoba Labour and Immigration at (Canada 001) 204-945-2806.

Manitoba Provincial Nominee program for skilled workers

Under the MB PNP for skilled workers, Manitoba recruits, screens and nominates prospective immigrants with the skills to fill specific Manitoba labour market requirements. If you are a skilled worker and are interested in living and working in Manitoba, you have the best chance of being nominated if:

  • Your training and work experience is in demand in Manitoba;
  • You have a guaranteed job offer consistent with your training and experience; and
  • You have settlement supports in Manitoba to assist you upon your arrival in Manitoba.

The above factors are determined when your application is assessed according to the criteria outlined in this kit. If Manitoba nominates you, a Certificate of Nomination will be issued. You can then apply for a permanent resident visa through Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC). You must still meet the federal regulatory requirements (medical examination, security and criminal checks) as outlined by CIC.

How do I know if I should apply for the Manitoba Provincial Nominee program?

Please consult the section entitled, "Who May Apply?". If you meet these conditions, complete the Self-Assessment Guide to see if you have 55 or more points. If your self-assessment shows that you have a good chance to be considered, and you want to live and work in Manitoba, you should submit your application and necessary supporting documents to Manitoba Labour and Immigration.

What criteria are used to assess Provincial Nominee applications?

The criteria, as defined by Manitoba Labour and Immigration, include age, education, occupational demand in Manitoba, guaranteed employment in Manitoba, work experience, regional development, language and adaptability.

Do I need to engage the services of a representative (i.e. lawyer or consultant) to help me complete my forms or advise me on my application?

You are not required to have a representative. Some people do choose to have a representative; however, if you hire someone, your application will not receive special attention, or be handled differently from other applications. Please see the brochure Immigration Representatives: Who they are and what you should know about them, included in this package or on our Web site: www.immigratemanitoba.com

Who do I include in my application?

Your spouse and all your dependent children must be included in your application. (See Important Terms for a definition of dependent children.) Your spouse and other dependent family members 18 years of age or over must complete the IMM 0008 and IMM 5406 forms.

What about my dependents who are not accompanying me to Canada?

All your dependents, whether they accompany you to Canada or not, must be included in Part A of your IMM 0008 application form. If they are 18 years of age or over, they must complete their own IMM 0008 and IMM 5406 application forms whether they are accompanying you to Canada or not.

Can my child, who is not considered a dependent according to CIC, come with my family to Manitoba?

Manitoba Labour and Immigration may issue Provincial Nominee Certificates of Nomination for accompanying adult dependents in order to facilitate the settling and retaining of the larger family unit in Manitoba. Certain conditions must be met for your adult dependent to be considered an accompanying family member under MB PNP. Consult "Who May Apply?" for details.

Can I claim my fiancé(e) as a dependent?

A fiancé(e) is not a dependent for purposes of immigration. If your fiancé(e) intends to accompany you to Manitoba, and you are not getting married before you apply for the MB PNP, he/she would need to fill out their own application and qualify on their own as a principal applicant.

Does it help if I have relatives in Manitoba?

Yes. If you or your spouse have a daughter, son, brother, sister, parent, grandparent, uncle, aunt, niece, nephew or first cousin in Manitoba, you will have a better chance of qualifying for the Manitoba Provincial Nominee program. Your relative must reside in Manitoba, be a permanent resident or Canadian citizen who is 18 years of age or older, and may be required to sign an affidavit of support. Proof of that relationship will be required.

What if I have no relatives in Manitoba but other Manitoba residents have offered to assist me in settling in Manitoba?

Under the family-like support provisions, a group of five or more adults are eligible to commit support for a provincial nominee. The supporters must meet established criteria and sign an affidavit that they will support the applicant and any dependents for a minimum of one year. A copy of the affidavit is available from Manitoba Labour and Immigration.

If my intended occupation requires licensing or registration, do I need to have all my work-related documentation in order before applying to the Manitoba Provincial Nominee program?

It depends on your occupation. Each province in Canada has different and strict accreditation requirements. Please research your individual case carefully. Consult our Web site, www.immigratemanitoba.com for links to sites that can give you more information.

Do my documents have to be translated by a certified translator?

All documents must be accurately translated into English or French for the Manitoba Provincial Nominee program. If nominated, the Canada visa office may require your documents to be translated by a certified translator.

I have a guaranteed job offer but my occupation is not on the Manitoba High Demand Occupations List for Provincial Nominees (HDOL-PN). Will I receive points for this job offer?

We recognize that there may be guaranteed job offers for occupations where you possess unique skills that are in demand, but the number of positions available do not warrant being listed on the HDOL-PN. There is a possibility we would consider giving points for your job offer, if your intended occupation is one considered to be in demand in Manitoba. The employer may provide any available documentation to help determine that your employment will not take jobs away from Canadian citizens or permanent residents.

How do I qualify for points under Regional Development?

If there is a demonstrated connection to your destination, which is outside the perimeter of Winnipeg, you may qualify for points under Regional Development. You need to demonstrate this connection and prove to Manitoba Labour and Immigration that you truly intend to settle and work there. Proof may include, but is not limited to:

  • Relatives in the area
  • Friends in the area
  • Other unique ties to the community
  • Experience living and/or working in a rural area
  • A list of potential employers in the region who require your occupation in that region
  • Proof of direct contact between the applicant and the employer
  • Any other documentation to help establish this connection

How much money must I bring with me to settle in Manitoba?

Provincial nominees are expected to be financially self-sufficient when they arrive in Manitoba. The amount of available money that you need will depend on a number of factors. These include, but are not limited to whether you have a job in Manitoba, if you have relatives or other family-like support, or if your spouse has a good chance of finding work. We will ask for further information about your financial resources when necessary. It is your responsibility to convince Manitoba Labour and Immigration that you have sufficient support. As a general guide, the Government of Canada recommends that you have at least $10,000 (Canadian) plus $2,000 (Canadian) for each accompanying dependent.

Is there a deadline for applying to the Manitoba Provincial Nominee program?

No. However, the selection criteria may change without notice. The occupations that are in demand in the province of Manitoba may also change. Your application will be assessed according to the criteria in place at the time we receive your application.

What fees will I have to pay?

There is no fee for applying to the Manitoba Provincial Nominee program. If you are approved as a provincial nominee, you will have to pay all federal processing fees and Right of Landing fees that apply to each member of your family. Do NOT include fees with your Provincial Nominee application for skilled workers. The federal fees, which are paid to the Canada visa office, should ONLY be paid if, and when, you are instructed to do so, by Manitoba Labour and Immigration.

Who assesses the applications for the Manitoba Provincial Nominee program?

Immigration program officers at Manitoba Labour and Immigration assess all applications. Each application is reviewed by at least two program officers.

If I am approved for the Manitoba Provincial Nominee program for skilled workers, what is my next step?

If you are approved as a Manitoba provincial nominee, you will receive a letter that explains the next steps. Successful applicants will be asked to submit their ORIGINAL application to a Canada visa office as soon as possible, and not longer than 180 days of being nominated by Manitoba Labour and Immigration. NOTE: The first step in this two-step application process is to submit your Manitoba Provincial Nominee application to Manitoba Labour and Immigration (address indicated in this package). Those chosen for the Manitoba Provincial Nominee program will be instructed on how to apply for their permanent resident visa through Citizenship and Immigration Canada, which has the final authority for issuing immigration visas. Do NOT send original documents to the Manitoba Provincial Nominee program. PROVINCIAL NOMINEE APPLICANTS SHOULD NOT SUBMIT ANY APPLICATIONS OR DOCUMENTS TO A CANADA VISA OFFICE UNTIL THEY ARE INSTRUCTED TO DO SO BY MANITOBA LABOUR AND IMMIGRATION.

Will I require a medical examination or criminal and security clearance?

Although a medical examination, and criminal and security checks are not required to be approved as a Manitoba provincial nominee, they will be required before you can receive a permanent resident visa for Canada. A person who is approved as a Manitoba provincial nominee, his or her spouse and dependent children, whether accompanying or not, will each need to have a medical examination. All adults will require a criminal and security check as well. Any related costs are the responsibility of the applicant. The medical examination and background checks are requirements of Citizenship and Immigration Canada. Successful applicants will receive further instructions regarding how and when to complete these tasks. Manitoba will withdraw the PN Certificate of Nomination prior to the issuance of the Permanent Resident visa (IMM 1000) if:

  • The provincial nominee, or any accompanying dependent, is found inadmissible as a result of medical, criminal or security checks, or
  • Manitoba Labour and Immigration learns that information provided in the application is false or misleading.

DO NOT TAKE A MEDICAL EXAMINATION FOR IMMIGRATION PURPOSES UNTIL YOU ARE INSTRUCTED TO DO SO BY CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION CANADA. OTHERWISE, YOUR EXAM RESULTS MAY EXPIRE, AND YOU WILL HAVE TO PAY TO RE-DO THE EXAM.

How long will it take for me to receive a Canadian Permanent Resident Visa?

Applying for a permanent resident visa under the Provincial Nominee program is a two-step process. The first step is the assessment and decision made on your application by Manitoba Labour and Immigration. Information on current processing times is available by contacting Manitoba Labour and Immigration.

If approved as a Manitoba provincial nominee, the second step begins when you apply to a Canada visa office for a permanent resident visa. Citizenship and Immigration Canada attempts to process Manitoba provincial nominees as quickly as possible. While processing times can vary from post to post, processing times on average are significantly less for provincial nominees than for applications through the federal streams. A significant difference is that if all documents are complete, an interview by the Canada visa office may not be required for Manitoba provincial nominees.

NOTE: There is no guarantee that an interview will be waived; however, experience has shown this is more likely to occur if an applicant is supported by a Manitoba Provincial Nominee Certificate.

The following can delay processing of your application: incomplete or unsigned application forms; missing documents; insufficient postage; missing fees; unclear photocopies; documents not accompanied by a certified English or French translation; a medical condition that may require additional tests; involvement in criminal activity; family situations such as divorce, custody or maintenance issues; or failure to notify of a change of address. YOUR APPLICATION WILL BE PROCESSED FASTER IF ALL OF THE ABOVE ARE AVOIDED.

Who May Apply?

General: Skilled workers may apply if they :

  • Are 18 years of age or older when their application reaches Manitoba Labour and Immigration;
  • Believe, after completing the self-assessment guide, that they meet the selection criteria and can provide all the required supporting documents; and
  • Reside outside of Canada OR have proof of legal status in Canada*.

* Please be advised that Manitoba Labour and Immigration will only assess an application if the applicant and dependents (if applicable) are residing outside of Canada or can provide proof that they have legal status in Canada. For example, refugee claimants in Canada are not eligible for consideration.

Foreign temporary workers in skilled occupations may apply if they :

  • Have an employment authorization for work in Manitoba that was validated by Human Resources Development Canada. The current employer may be contacted to determine the need for permanent workers in that occupation, and/or a willingness to hire on a permanent basis.

Foreign temporary workers in semi-skilled occupations* may apply if they :

  • Have been working in Manitoba for at least 12 months in a semi-skilled job that was validated by Human Resources Development Canada;
  • Have an employment authorization for work in Manitoba that is valid for longer than 12 months, or one that has been renewed beyond the initial 12 months; and
  • Have a guaranteed job offer from their current Manitoba employer that meets the criteria as explained in the Self-Assessment Guide.

* Semi-skilled occupations, for purposes of assessment under the MB PNP, have certain factors in common, including high turnover, frequent internal movement and on-the-job training. Semi-skilled occupations generally require two to four years of secondary school education (high school) along with short work demonstration or on-the-job training.

International students in Manitoba may apply if they :

  • Are 18 years or older when their application reaches Manitoba Labour and Immigration;
  • Have completed a course of post-secondary studies in a Manitoba educational institution;
  • Have completed at least six months of post-graduate employment (E08 Exemption) and are working in a study-related job; and
  • Have a guaranteed job offer in Manitoba that meets the criteria explained in the Self-Assessment Guide.

Accompanying adult dependents may be issued a MB PNP Certificate of Nomination if the principal applicant (parent) is approved as a provincial nominee and if the adult dependent :

  • Is between the ages of 18-25 and is not considered a dependent child by CIC;
  • Achieves a minimum of 25 points under CIC's skilled worker program;
  • Has never been married or had children of their own;
  • Is living with the principal applicant (parent) at the time the application is made; and
  • Will be travelling to Manitoba at the same time as the principal applicant.

Adult dependents who wish to accompany their families to Manitoba, and who meet the above conditions, should include an IMM 0008, IMM 5406 and supporting documents for those forms together with the parent's application.